A condominium can be defined as a single real estate unit in a multi-unit development in which a person has both separate ownership of a unit and a common interest, along with the development’s other owners, in the common areas.1 Insuring your condominium is often not so easy, especially since it usually requires that you are covered by both your condominium’s master policy and your own separate individual insurance policy. It’s important to closely review the condominium association’s declaration document, which details what real property the unit-owner is responsible for insuring separately.
Continue Reading Understanding How Your Condominium Insurance Works—The Individual vs. Master Policy Coverages

In Lakeside Village Homeowners Association, Inc. v. Belanger,1 the Texas Court of Appeals found an HOA violated the Declaration of Covenants when it delayed repairing common areas of the Lakeside Village townhome community in Rockwall County, Texas.


Continue Reading Association’s Delay in Repair of Common Area Results in Payment to Owners of Damaged Townhomes

Condominium property is often divided and categorized into association property and unit property. Association property can be further subdivided into common elements and limited common elements. How an area of condominium property is classified may change the respective rights and responsibilities of the association and its members, including whose insurance will cover damage to each type of property.


Continue Reading Who is Responsible for Limited Common Elements?